Thursday, June 21, 2018

31 Oct

Pruning Perennials…

It’s not just trees and shrubs that need pruning in your garden. Perennials will produce better quality flowers if you prune them regularly. Some perennials are evergreen so they don’t need pruning and will look fantastic whilst dormant in the winter. Other perennials however can be damaged by a lack of pruning…

Deadheading…

The majority of your garden flowers will bloom and set seed before you prune them. Make sure you deadhead flowers as the blooms begin to fade. This tidies up the plant and encourages more blooms. To deadhead perennials you can simply snap off the dead flower with your thumb and forefinger.

Pinching…

You may think that it’s impossible to change which buds your plant chooses to produce a flower from. If your perennial concentrates on the tip bud, instead of the buds lower down on the shoot,┬áremove or ‘pinch’ the tip bud and your plant will produce more side shoots. This will give your perennial a healthy, bushy look. Some perennials may need pinching a few times.

Keeping your perennials compact…

Chop back your perennials in late spring to make your plants flower more prolifically. Cut your plants back by half for best results.

Preventing leggy perennials…

Lightly shearing over some perennials will have the effect of both deadheading and light pruning. This prevents any leggy growth, will keep your perennials compact and encourage new healthy growth the following year.

Preventing perennial pests…

Pests are easily prevented when it comes to perennials. Simply cut back any dead or yellowing foliage on hardy perennials. This will make your plants look tidier and stop any pests from using the dying leaves for shelter over the winter.


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